Interior Design

interior design students.jpg

The goal of our department is to prepare students for the Interior Design profession.

Requirements     Facilities      FAQs     Non-Majors     Equipment     Graduation Rates

Council for Interior Design Accreditation:

The Interior Design program in the Lamar Dodd School of Art is fully accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA), formerly known as FIDER. The program was initially accredited in 1984. It was re-accredited in 2013 for a term extending through 2019.

All potential students should note that graduation from a CIDA-accredited program is one of the pre-requisites for licensing of Interior Designers in the State of Georgia.

National Association of Schools of Art and Design: 

The program also is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD).

Career Placement

Ninety-five percent of the students that graduated in May 2013 were employed by December 2013.

Places Our Graduates Have Launched Their Design Careers

Over the past few years our students have begun careers as both residential and non-residential interior designers, mostly in hospitality and architecture design firms. The following is a sampling of firms our graduates have joined:

Alicia Mooney Interiors, Atlanta, GA
August Avery, Atlanta, GA
Blackdog Studio, Atlanta, GA
Bon Chérie Designs, LLC, Atlanta, GA
Bradley-Blewster & Associates, Chicago, Illinois
Bungalow LLC, Washington D.C.
Carl Vinson Institute of Government, UGA, Athens, GA
Cassidy Turley, Atlanta, GA
Clausen Chewning Interior Design, Atlanta, GA
Complete Bathrooms, New Zealand
Cooper Carry, Atlanta, GA
CSE, Atlanta, GA
Cullen and Company, Athens, GA
Dalton Carpet One, Athens, GA
Design Continuum Inc., Atlanta, GA
Design Coordinator at Chick-fil-A, Inc., Atlanta, GA
designproject, LLC, Chicago, IL
Dickinson Architects, Augusta, GA
Domino Magazine | Market Editor, New York, NY
E+E Architecture, Tulsa, OK
E+E Architecture, Athens, GA
E+E Architecture, Lawrenceville, GA
Ellis Design Group, Athens, GA
Ferry, Hayes and Allen Designers, Inc., Atlanta, GA
Geiger International, New York, NY
Gensler, Atlanta, GA
Gensler, New York, NY
George P. Johnson, Torrance, CA
Glazer Design & Construction, Athens, GA
Graham Field, Atlanta, GA
Green Living Designs, Atlanta, GA
Gresham, Smith and Partners, Nashville, TN
Gulfstream, Savannah, GA
Gulfstream Aerospace, Savannah, GA
Hendrick, Inc., Jacksonville, FL
Hendrick, Inc., Atlanta, GA
Hirsch Bedner Associates, Atlanta, GA
Hirsch Bedner Associates, Santa Monica, CA
Humanscale, Atlanta, GA
Italo Ceramica, Washington D.C.
Jacobs Engineering, Atlanta, GA
Jo-Ann Stores, Inc., Atlanta, GA
Jonas Workroom, New York, NY
Kemp's Dalton West Flooring, Newnan, GA
KMH Interiors, Atlanta, GA
Knickerbocker Group, Portland, ME
Koncept Design Studio, Atlanta, GA
Kristin Butler Design, Athens, GA
LeVino-Jones Medical Interiors, Athens, GA
LeVino-Jones Medical Interiors, Atlanta, GA
Lindsey Lane Design, LLC. New York, NY
Lotan Center for Creative Ecology, Chicago IL
Lyman Davidson Dooley, Marietta, GA
Maxwell High School of Technology, Athens, GA
Miller Architecure and Planning, Atlanta, GA
MSTSD, Atlanta, GA
Nitterhouse Masonry Products, LLC., Washington D.C.
PFVS Interiors, Atlanta, GA
Pierce & Co, Nashville, TN
Pineapple House Interior Design, Atlanta, GA
Preston Partnership, Atlanta, GA
Red Door Design Studio, Athens, GA
Rule Joy Trammell + Rubio, Atlanta, GA
Shop Design, Inc., Atlanta, GA
Steelcare, Atlanta, GA
The Orvis Company, Manchester Center, VT
Wakefield, Beasley & Associates, Atlanta, GA
Wendover Art Group, Atlanta, GA
Whitehall Interiors, New York, NY
Wolf Popper LLP, Atlanta, GA

Acceptance into Graduate Programs by UGA ID Alumni

Recent graduates have been accepted into a variety of graduate programs either immediately after completing their undergraduate studies or after gaining one or more years of professional interior design experience. The following list represents the diversity and distribution of these programs.

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Masters in Interior Design 

  • Arizona State University

Masters of Architecture 

  • Clemson University
  • Georgia Technological University
  • North Carolina State University
  • University of Cincinnati
  • University of Tennessee
  • University of Washington
  • Virginia Technological University

Masters in Industrial Design

  • Georgia Technological University

Law Degrees

  • Charleston School of Law
  • Georgia State University

Masters of Business Administration

  • University of Georgia

Acceptance into the Undergraduate Interior Design Program

Students are accepted into the program after completing the School of Art Foundation Studio and Art History Program, two preliminary Interior Design courses, and the Interior Design Progression Review. The latter includes a portfolio review, the completion of a weekend-long design project, and a review of academic performance. The two preliminary Interior Design courses and ID Progression Review are offered each fall semester.

In the past five years, acceptance has ranged from a low of 17 to a high of 27 students. One hundred percent of the students who were accepted into the program have graduated. During the past 20 years, over 99% of all students accepted into the program have graduated in a timely fashion.

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Retention Rates

Typically, one to three students self-select to not move forward after the first Interior Design courses and before going through the Interior Design Progression Review process. The majority of these students remain in the School of Art. The Interior Design courses count as studio or general education electives across the School.

Typical of all Interior Design programs our curriculum has numerous prerequisite and co-requisite classes. These are carefully crafted into an interdependent sequence of courses that must be taken in chronological order. The School of Art Foundations program takes two semesters to complete. The Interior Design sequence takes six. Students who begin the program within their first year at the University of Georgia complete their degrees within four years unless prohibited by external personal matters, like health issues.

Students anticipating transferring to the University of Georgia should contact the Interior Design Area Chair or the School of Art Advising Office as early in their academic careers as possible.

2013–2014 Academic Year

  •     100% of the upper division students returned fall 2013, putting attrition at 0%.

  •     100% of the second year students who went through the Interior Design Progression Review at the end of fall semester returned for spring semester.

  •     29% of the third year students took studio classes in Athens in the spring. The remaining 71% of the third year students took studio classes in Cortona, Italy, summer semester.

  •     100% of the fourth year students graduated either spring or summer semester.

2012–2013 Academic Year

  • 100% of the upper division students returned fall 2012, putting attrition at 0%.

  •  100% of the second year students who went through the Interior Design Progression Review at the end of fall semester returned for spring semester.

  •     4% of the third year students (i.e. 1 student) dropped out for personal reasons.
37% of the third year students took studio classes in Athens in the spring. The remaining 57% of the third year students took studio classes in Cortona, Italy, summer semester.

  •     100% of the fourth year students graduated either spring or summer semester.

2011–2012 Academic Year

  •     100% of the upper division students returned fall 2011, putting attrition at 0%.
  •     3% of the third year students (i.e. 1 student) dropped out for personal reasons.
41% of the third year students took studio classes in Athens in the spring. The remaining 56% of the third year students took studio classes in Cortona, Italy, summer semester.
  •     100% of the fourth year students graduated either spring or summer semester.  

Graduation Rates

Typical of all Interior Design programs our curriculum has numerous prerequisite and co-requisite classes. These are carefully crafted into an interdependent sequence of courses that must be taken in chronological order. The School of Art Foundations program takes two semesters to complete. The Interior Design sequence takes six. Students who begin the program within their first year at the University of Georgia complete their degrees within four years unless prohibited by external personal matters.

2014 Graduations

  •     76% of the graduates completed the program in 4 years

  •     14% of the graduates completed the program in 5 years

  •     10% of the graduates completed the program in 6 years

2013 Graduations

  •     83% of the graduates completed the program in 4 years

  •     13% of the graduates completed the program in 4 years

  •     4% of the graduates completed the program in 4 years

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Requirements

When applying to the University of Georgia, use the following Intended Undergraduate Major code: 3088 Intended Art/Studio Art

Portfolio required after first year.

For current requirements, refer to the online UGA Bulletin.

Area IV Courses:

ARST 1040 Professional Seminar
ARST 1050 Drawing I
ARST 1060 Color and Composition
ARST 1070 Drawing II
ARST 1080 3D Design
ARHI 2300 Art History I
ARHI 2400 Art History II

Pre-requisite Interior Design Courses

ARID 2110 Studio I: Single Family Residential Design
ARID 2210 Concepts in Design

NOTE 1: ARID 2110 and 2210 are offered during fall semester only.

NOTE 2: Students do NOT have to complete all Foundation courses before starting the sequence, but they must have passed the School of Art Portfolio Review..

Interior Design Progression Review

Full progression into the Interior Design program requires completion of the Foundations program, ARID 2110, and ARID 2210. Admission is based on the area's resources and results of the Interior Design Progression Review, held at the end of Fall Semester. Students apply after completing ARID 2110 and ARID 2210. Faculty review the following materials:

  1. cumulative GPA
  2. portfolio of work from ID and foundation art studios
  3. evaluation of an assigned weekend-long project
  4. grades on prerequisite art and ID courses
  5. effort and participation in ID studio courses

* Students may use an approved study abroad experience to replace the internship requirement with an approved elective. Choose "Study in Cortona, Italy" link on the ID Undergraduate Program site.

Find detailed BFA degree requirements for each area of emphasis here.
For current requirements, refer to the UGA Bulletin.

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Facilities

Fall Semester Field Trips

Each fall the interior design program offers a major field trip on a rotating basis to New York, San Francisco or Chicago. Trips span five nights and six days. Undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in Studio I, III, or V may participate.

Activities vary each year and include:

  1. Visiting prominent design firms
  2. Witnessing state-of-the-art design
  3. Touring significant buildings
  4. Experiencing major showrooms
  5. Reinforcing current studio courses
  6. Discovering unique cultural aspects
  7. Seeing major galleries and museums

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FAQs

Student Profile

Students entering this field must be interested in, and aware of, the interior and exterior environment. They must be dedicated to planning the most functional and aesthetic interior spaces for all human purposes. They must have self-confidence, be self-disciplined, inventive, and able to work under pressure, and meet deadlines.

Students should be design-oriented. They must have the ability to express ideas by free-hand drawing, architectural drafting, computer-aided design (CAD), physical and electronic models, and other graphic media. They must be able to present their ideas visually and verbally. They should be knowledgeable and conversant in historic and contemporary architectural and interior design areas.

Most of our graduates are affiliated with architectural and medium to large-scale non-residential interior design firms. Others pursue careers in residential design. A significant number seek advanced degrees in interior or architectural design

Employment

Interior Design is a service profession, dealing largely with people and their needs. The demand for design services has grown rapidly. With that growth has come a wide range of specialties in both residential and non-residential design.

Our graduates are pursuing active careers designing the following types of projects:

  • residences
  • offices
  • restaurants, hotels, spas and resort
  • health-related facilities
  • retail spaces
  • exhibits
  • places of worship
  • schools and college campuses
  • museums
  • theaters
  • government facilities
  • transportation terminals
  • even the interiors of trains, ships and airplanes

Information about the Profession

Visit web sites for these organizations to learn more about the interior design profession, accreditation of interior design programs, and the qualifications for licensing of interior designers in the State of Georgia.

American Society of Interior Designers (ASID)
What is interior design?
What are specialties within interior design?

International Interior Design Association (IIDA)
Definition of an interior designer.

Council for Interior Design Accreditation
List of accredited programs.

National Council for Interior Design Qualification (NCIDQ)
Information on the qualifying exam.

Interior Design Experience Program (IDEP)
This program is administered by NCIDQ and requires a degree from a Council-accredited program.

Georgia State Board of Architects Licensing of Interior Designers Application requirements include having a degree from a Council-accredited program and passing the NCIDQ Exam.

Transferring Into the Interior Design Program

Transfer students should contact the Interior Design Area Chair as soon as possible. Do so at least one full semester before transferring. This will facilitate progression into the Interior Design program and may prevent graduation delays after transferring. E-mail thouser@uga.edu.

If you start the Art Studio Foundations sequence in the Spring or Summer semester, contact the Interior Design Area Chair BEFORE registering for Fall Semester, E-mailthouser@uga.edu.

You do NOT have to complete all Foundation course requirements before enrolling in ARID 2010 Concepts and ARID 2110 Studio I. You do, however, have to meet them before progressing into the ID program after the ID Progression Review.

All transfer students must meet the School of Art Portfolio Review and Interior Design Progression Review requirements.

Study Abroad in Cortona, Italy

The UGA Studies Abroad Program in Cortona offers two interior design studio classes during summer session:

ARID 3130 Studio IV and
ARID 3340 Furniture Design

Graduate students and non-UGA undergrads may apply for these courses or parallel special topics. All students must meet pre-requisites. Students are encouraged to take an academic course to complete their schedules. Exceptional students may apply for a third studio.

Click here to read a review of the Congress Center in Rome designed by Studio Fuksas Atelier, an architectural firm headquartered in Rome. Interior design students toured this job site summer 2010. Click here to explore the Studio Fuksas web site.

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Computers

All interior design students must take laptop computers with specified software to Italy. Details are given in the course syllabi each year.

For more information about Cortona and other School of Art international opportunities go to the Studies Abroad pull-down menu at the top of this page. Also, click HERE to read a letter from Christopher Robinson, Director, Cortona Studies Abroad.

Laptop Computers

The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Art provide an instructional lab with computer-aided design (CAD), graphic presentation, and general software. From the second semester of the second year and on through graduation, most studio projects have significant CAD components. There is a very high demand placed on the lab to meet instructional needs. It is available during non-class times for anyone in the School of Art having appropriate training. 

Students are not required to own personal computers; however, most find they benefit from doing so. We strongly recommend that students purchase laptop computers. While these cost more than desktop computers they have significant advantages. Students can bring their computers to work in any studio. They can work both on and off campus, in and out of town. Further, we can help trouble-shoot hardware and software problems on laptops in ways we obviously can not with desktop computers.

NOTE: Every interior design major studying in Cortona MUST take a LAPTOP computer with specified software to Italy. Select the Cortona link in the column at the left for details.

Windows or Mac?

The computer-aided design software used in Interior Design is based on the Windows operating system. However, it will run on a Macintosh that has an Intel Core 2 Duo processor (or better) with both Macintosh and Windows operating systems.

Basic Mac OR Windows Laptop Specifications:

2.5 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo processor, faster better
Windows 7 64 bit (must add if using a Mac)
4 GB of RAM (memory), 8 GB strongly recommended
500 GB hard disk storage, minimum
15" screen minimum,
Computer mouse
500 GB external hard drive or greater (USB for PC, USB, FireWire, or Thunderbolt for Mac)

Required Software:

Microsoft Office Suite (PC or Mac)
Adobe CS5 or CS5.5 (PC or Mac)
Autodesk Architecture Suite (including AutoCAD)
SketchUp Pro

Software Purchase Notes:

Do not download Autodesk software until you take ARID 3410.
UGA students can purchase many programs from eMSD with substantial discounts. https://emsd.uga.edu/Catalog/Home/Display

For a breakdown of the software system requirements, aggregated "highest common denominator" recommended system specifications, and a few examples of computers that fit the bill, click here.

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Courses for Non-Majors

The Interior Design area invites students from other majors into the following courses on a space-available basis. Some restrictions apply as noted below. Please e–mailthouser@uga.edu for registration clearance, as needed.

ARID 2210 Concepts in Design
ARID 3210 History of Decorative Arts I
ARID 3220 History of Decorative Arts II
ARID 3340 Furniture Design
ARID 4015/6015 Documentation of Vernacular Architecture
ARID 4410/6410 Time-based Media and Design

ARID 2210 Concepts in Design

Techniques for developing ideas and advancing creative and problem-solving skills while designing three-dimensional spaces. Taught in the context of professional practice in interior design and related fields.

ARID 3210 Design History I

A historical survey of architecture and concepts of interior space, furniture, and allied crafts as a background for contemporary design.

NOTE: Course does NOT meet Art History elective requirements for non-ID students.

ARID 3220 Design History II

Decorative arts of Europe and America beginning with the Arts and Crafts Movement of the nineteenth century and continuing through the twentieth century.

NOTE: Course does NOT meet Art History elective requirements for non-ID students.

ARID 3340 Furniture Design

Cabinetry and furniture design, including construction methods, drawings, and design presentation.
NOTE: Student must demonstrate previous drafting or CAD experience to qualify.

ARID 4015/6015 Documentation of Vernacular Architecture

To study and investigate the socio-cultural influence on traditional indigenous buildings and houses; family structure, social customs, and religion. Involves the documentation of house plans and elevations; identification of house typologies, spatial layout and relationship of interior and exterior spaces, building materials, and construction methods used.

ARID 4410/6410 Time-Based Media and Design

Time-based media as tool and catalyst for designing objects and/or spaces. Use of walkthroughs, fly-arounds, animations, and renderings in ideation, development, and presentation processes. Employs multiple CAD, drawing, rendering, photo, and/or video software programs.

NOTE 1: Student should have experience using AutoCAD, Rhino, or similar software.

NOTE 2: ARID 3410 or ARST 4810/6810 or permission of department.

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