The Interior Design program at the Lamar Dodd School of Art supports training in the field of interior design at the undergraduate and graduate level. Interior Design is a service profession, dealing largely with people and their needs. The demand for design services has grown rapidly. With that growth has come a wide range of specialties in both residential and non-residential design. Most of our graduates are affiliated with architectural and medium to large-scale non-residential interior design firms. Others pursue careers in residential design. A significant number seek advanced degrees in architectural, industrial, or interior design.

Students interested in Interior Design should be design-oriented. They must have the ability to express ideas by free-hand drawing, architectural drafting, computer-aided design (CAD), physical and electronic models, and other graphic media. They must be able to present their ideas both visually and verbally and should be knowledgeable and conversant in historic and contemporary architectural and interior design areas.​

Interior Design

Accreditation

The Interior Design program at the Lamar Dodd School of Art is accredited through the Council for Interior Design and the National Association of Schools of Art and Design:

Council for Interior Design Accreditation:

The Interior Design program is fully accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA), formerly known as FIDER. The program was initially accredited in 1984. It was re-accredited in 2013 for a term extending through 2019. All potential students should note that graduation from a CIDA-accredited program is one of the pre-requisites for licensing of Interior Designers in the State of Georgia.

National Association of Schools of Art and Design: 

The program also is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD).


Study in the area of interior design is supported through the programming of the School of Art, study abroad, and dedicated computers and facilities. The Interior Design building, Broad Street Studio 2, provides a studio environment that facilitates the design and exploration of the built environment. Learn more about the studio spaces at the Lamar Dodd School of Art here.

Study Abroad

The UGA Studies Abroad Program in Cortona takes place in the hilltown of Cortona, Italy. While based in Cortona, students begin their experience in Rome or Naples and make field trips to major cities and artistic centers in Italy such as Perugia, Assisi, Siena, Florence, among others. The summer session of Study Abroad in Cortona offers two interior design studio classes (ARID 3130 Studio IV and ARID 3340 Furniture Design). Students are encouraged to take an additional academic course to complete their schedules. Exceptional students may apply for a third studio. All interior design students must take laptop computers with specified software to Italy. Details are given in the course syllabi each year. Learn more about Studies Abroad at Cortona here

Laptop Computers and Facilities

The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Art provide an instructional lab with computer-aided design (CAD), graphic presentation, and general software. From the second semester of the second year and on through graduation, most studio projects have significant CAD components. There is a very high demand placed on the lab to meet instructional needs. It is available during non-class times for anyone in the School of Art who has appropriate training. 

Students are not required to own personal computers; however, most find they benefit from doing so. We strongly recommend that students purchase laptop computers. While they cost more than desktop computers, they have significant advantages. Students can bring laptop computers to work in any studio. They can work both on and off campus, in and out of town. Further, we can help troubleshoot hardware and software problems on laptops in ways we obviously cannot with desktop computers.

WINDOWS OR MAC?

The computer-aided design (CAD) software used in Interior Design is based on the Windows operating system. It can run on Apple laptops, if and only if the computer has both Apple and Windows operating systems installed. Critical CAD software that you must use within the Interior Design program is not available for the Apple operating system.

Recommended laptop specifications:  

  •  Windows 10 or newer operating system
  • 5th Gen Intel i7 processor or AMD equivalent 
  • 16GB RAM or maximum available 
  • 1 TB hard drive or greater
  • 802.11 Wireless Network
  • 15” laptop screen
  • nVIDIA or AMD Graphics Card preferred
  • 64GB USB flash drive
  • Portable USB hard drive
  • Wireless mouse
  • HDMI video output with VGA adapter
  • Adobe Creative Cloud Complete (monthly fee) 
  • Microsoft Office (free for currently enrolled students)
  • Sketchup Pro (yearly fee)
  • Autodesk Products: (Free 1 year renewable licenses ― must register with UGA Email address)
  • AutoCAD
  • Revit Architecture
  • 3D Studio Max

Learn More about the Profession of Interior Design

Georgia State Board of Architects Licensing of Interior Designers Application requirements include having a degree from a Council-accredited program and passing the NCIDQ Exam. The following websites can help you learn more about the interior design profession, accreditation of interior design programs, and the qualifications for licensing of interior designers in the State of Georgia:


Graduate Interior Design

The Master of Fine Art (MFA) program in Interior Design provides opportunities to demonstrate graduate graduate-level mastery of interior design by exploring issues related to advanced problem seeking and problem solving projects or formal aspects of interior design research. 

In addition to the general requirements, admission to the graduate program in interior design requires an undergraduate degree in interior design, architecture, or a related discipline. Exceptions may be made for students graduating from diverse programs. Students may be required to complete specific undergraduate courses determined at the time of acceptance into the program. 

For more information about graduate programs at the Lamar Dodd School of Art, contact our Graduate Office.


Undergraduate Interior Design

Students entering this field must be interested in, and aware of, the interior and exterior environment. They must be dedicated to planning the most functional and aesthetic interior spaces for all human purposes. They must have self-confidence, be self-disciplined, inventive, and able to work under pressure, and meet deadlines.

Students are accepted into the program after completing the School of Art Foundation Studio and Art History Program, two preliminary Interior Design courses, and the Interior Design Progression Review. The latter includes a portfolio review, the completion of a weekend-long design project, and a review of academic performance. The two preliminary Interior Design courses and Interior Design Progression Review are offered each fall semester. In the past five years, acceptance has ranged from a low of 17 to a high of 27 students. One hundred percent of the students who were accepted into the program have graduated. During the past twenty years, over 99% of all students accepted into the program have graduated in a timely fashion.

Students anticipating transferring to the University of Georgia should contact the Interior Design Area Chair or the School of Art Advising Office as early in their academic careers as possible. 

Retention Rates

Typically, one or two students self-select to not move forward after the first Interior Design courses and before going through the Interior Design Progression Review process. The majority of these students remain in the School of Art. The Interior Design courses count as studio or general education electives across the School.

Like all Interior Design programs, the curriculum has numerous prerequisite and co-requisite classes. These are carefully crafted in an interdependent sequence of courses that must be taken in chronological order. The School of Art Foundations program takes two semesters to complete. The Interior Design sequence takes six. Students who begin the program within their first year at the University of Georgia complete their degrees within four years unless prohibited by extenuating personal matters, like health issues.

2016–2017 ACADEMIC YEAR
  • 100% of the upper-division students returned fall 2016, putting attrition at 0%.
  • 96% of the second-year students who went through the Interior Design Progression Review at the end of fall semester returned for spring semester.
  • 42% of the third-year students took studio classes in Athens in the spring. The remaining 58% of the third-year students took studio classes in Cortona, Italy, during the summer semester.
  • 100% of the fourth-year students graduated.
2015–2016 ACADEMIC YEAR
  • 100% of the upper-division students returned fall 2015, putting attrition at 0%.
  • 100% of the second-year students who went through the Interior Design Progression Review at the end of fall semester returned for spring semester.
  • 45% of the third-year students took studio classes in Athens in the spring. The remaining 55% of the third-year students took studio classes in Cortona, Italy, during the summer semester.
  • 100% of the fourth-year students.
2014–2015 ACADEMIC YEAR
  • 100% of the upper-division students returned fall 2014, putting attrition at 0%.
  • 100% of the second-year students who went through the Interior Design Progression Review at the end of fall semester returned for spring semester.
  • 52% of the third-year students took studio classes in Athens in the spring. The remaining 48% of the third-year students took studio classes in Cortona, Italy, during the summer semester.
  • 100% of the fourth-year students graduated.
2013–2014 ACADEMIC YEAR
  • 100% of the upper-division students returned fall 2013, putting attrition at 0%.
  • 100% of the second-year students who went through the Interior Design Progression Review at the end of fall semester returned for spring semester.
  •  41% of the third-year students took studio classes in Athens in the spring. The remaining 59% of the third-year students took studio classes in Cortona, Italy, during the summer semester.
  • 100% of the fourth-year students graduated.
2012–2013 ACADEMIC YEAR
  • 100% of the upper-division students returned fall 2012, putting attrition at 0%.
  • 100% of the second-year students who went through the Interior Design Progression Review at the end of fall semester returned for spring semester.
  • 4% of the third-year students (i.e. one student) dropped out for personal reasons.
  • 37% of the third-year students took studio classes in Athens in the spring. The remaining 57% of the third-year students took studio classes in Cortona, Italy, during the summer semester.
  • 100% of the fourth-year students graduated.
2011–2012 ACADEMIC YEAR
  • 100% of the upper division students returned fall 2011, putting attrition at 0%. 
  • 3% of the third-year students (i.e. one student) dropped out for personal reasons.
  • 41% of the third-year students took studio classes in Athens in the spring. The remaining 56% of the third-year students took studio classes in Cortona, Italy, during the summer semester.

Graduation Rates

Students who begin the program within their first year at the University of Georgia complete their degrees within four years unless prohibited by extenuating personal matters. Depending on what point within their academic careers they enter the Interior Design program, internal and external transfer students with more than one year of previous coursework take longer than four years to graduate.

2017 Graduates
  • 81% of the graduates completed the program in 4 years
  • 14% of the graduates completed the program in 5 years
  •  5% of the graduates completed the program in 6 years
2016 Graduates
  • 76% of the graduates completed the program in 4 years
  • 14% of the graduates completed the program in 5 years
  • 10% of the graduates completed the program in 6 years
2015 Graduates
  • 76% of the graduates completed the program in 4 years
  • 14% of the graduates completed the program in 5 years
  • 10% of the graduates completed the program in 6 years
2014 Graduates
  • 76% of the graduates completed the program in 4 years
  • 14% of the graduates completed the program in 5 years
  • 10% of the graduates completed the program in 6 years
2013 Graduates
  • 83% of the graduates completed the program in 4 years
  • 13% of the graduates completed the program in 4 years
  • 4% of the graduates completed the program in 4 years

Acceptance into Graduate Programs 

Recent graduates from the Lamar Dodd School of Art Interior Design program have been accepted into a variety of graduate programs either immediately after completing their undergraduate studies or after gaining one or more years of professional interior design experience. The following list represents the diversity and distribution of these programs:

Masters in Interior Design 

  • Arizona State University

Masters of Architecture 

  • Clemson University
  • Georgia Technological University
  • North Carolina State University
  • University of Cincinnati
  • University of Tennessee
  • University of Washington
  • Virginia Technological University

Masters in Industrial Design

  • Georgia Institute of Technology

Law Degrees

  • Charleston School of Law
  • Georgia State University

Masters of Business Administration

  • University of Georgia

Career Placement

Fifty percent of our May 2017 graduates were employed upon graduation. Ninety-five percent of our May 2016 graduates were employed by December 2016, while five percent of May 2016 graduates entered directly into graduate school. Graduates are pursuing active careers designing projects such as residences; offices; restaurants, hotels, spas, and resorts; health-related facilities; retail spaces; exhibits; places of worship; schools and college campuses; museums; theaters; government facilities; transportation terminals; and even the interiors of trains, ships, and airplanes. 

Recent graduates have begun careers as both residential and non-residential interior designers, mostly in hospitality and architecture design firms. The following sample of employers dates back five years:

  • 2KM Architects, Inc., Augusta, GA
  • Alicia Mooney Interiors, Atlanta, GA
  • August Avery, Atlanta, GA
  • Barrie Benson Interior Design, Charlotte, NC
  • Blackdog Studio, Atlanta, GA
  • BoggsVickers Architects, LLC, Atlanta, GA
  • Bon Chérie Designs, LLC, Atlanta, GA
  • Bork Architectural Design, Athens, GA
  • Bradley-Blewster & Associates, Chicago, Illinois
  • Bradley Interiors, Inc., Atlanta, GA
  • Bungalow LLC, Washington D.C.
  • Carl Vinson Institute of Government, UGA, Athens, GA
  • Cassidy Turley, Atlanta, GA
  • CDH Partners, Inc., Marietta, GA
  • Chick-fil-A, Inc., Atlanta, GA
  • Clausen Chewning Interior Design, Atlanta, GA
  • Complete Bathrooms, New Zealand
  • Cooper Carry, Atlanta, GA
  • Corgan Inc., Dallas, TX
  • CSE, Atlanta, GA
  • Cullen and Company, Athens, GA
  • Dalton Carpet One, Athens, GA
  • Design Continuum Inc., Atlanta, GA
  • designproject, LLC, Chicago, IL
  • Dickinson Architects, Augusta, GA
  • Domino Magazine | Market Editor, New York, NY
  • Drew McGukin Interior Design, New York, NY
  • E+E Architecture, Athens, GA
  • E+E Architecture, Lawrenceville, GA
  • E+E Architecture, Tulsa, OK
  • Ellis Design Group, Athens, GA
  • Ferry, Hayes and Allen Designers, Inc., Atlanta, GA
  • Floor and Décor, Savannah, GA
  • Focus Design Interiors, Atlanta, GA
  • Geiger International, New York, NY
  • Gensler, Atlanta, GA
  • Gensler, New York, NY
  • George P. Johnson, Torrance, CA
  • Glazer Design & Construction, Athens, GA
  • Good Sense and Company, Brooklyn, NY
  • Graham Field, Atlanta, GA
  • Green Living Designs, Atlanta, GA
  • Gresham, Smith and Partners, Nashville, TN
  • Gulfstream, Savannah, GA
  • Gulfstream Aerospace, Savannah, GA
  • Hendrick, Inc., Atlanta, GA
  • Hendrick, Inc., Jacksonville, FL
  • Hirsch Bedner Associates, Atlanta, GA
  • Hirsch Bedner Associates, Santa Monica, CA
  • Humanscale, Atlanta, GA
  • Italo Ceramica, Washington D.C.
  • Jacobs Engineering, Atlanta, GA
  • Jonas Workroom, New York, NY
  • Johnson Studio @ Cooper Carry, Atlanta, GA
  • Kemp's Dalton West Flooring, Newnan, GA
  • KMH Interiors, Atlanta, GA
  • Knickerbocker Group, Portland, ME
  • Koncept Design Studio, Atlanta, GA
  • Kristin Butler Design, Athens, GA
  • LeVino-Jones Medical Interiors, Athens, GA
  • Lindsey Lane Design, LLC. New York, NY
  • Little Diversified Architectural Consulting, Charlotte, NC
  • Lotan Center for Creative Ecology, Chicago IL
  • Lyman Davidson Dooley, Marietta, GA
  • May Architecture + Interiors, Atlanta, GA
  • Mcgaritys Business Products, Gainesville, GA
  • Miller Architecture and Planning, Atlanta, GA
  • MSTSD Architects, Atlanta, GA
  • Nitterhouse Masonry Products, LLC., Washington D.C.
  • Office Creations, Inc., Suwanee, GA
  • Orvis Company, Manchester Center, VT
  • Peacock Partnership,  Atlanta, GA
  • PFVS Interiors, Atlanta, GA
  • Pierce & Co, Nashville, TN
  • Pineapple House Interior Design, Atlanta, GA
  • Plexus R+D (Research & Design), Athens, GA
  • Preston Partnership, Atlanta, GA
  • Red Door Design Studio, Athens, GA
  • Rule Joy Trammell + Rubio, Atlanta, GA
  • F. Schumacher & Co., Atlanta, GA
  • Shop Design, Inc., Atlanta, GA
  • Steelcare, Atlanta, GA
  • Streetsense Real Estate, Bethesda, MD
  • Suyama Peterson Deguchi Architects, Seattle, WA
  • THW Design, Atlanta, GA
  • Traci Rhoads Interiors, LLC, Atlanta, GA
  • VeenendaalCave, Inc., Atlanta, GA
  • Wakefield, Beasley & Associates, Atlanta, GA
  • Wendover Art Group, Atlanta, GA
  • Whitehall Interiors, New York, NY
  • Wolf Popper LLP, Atlanta, GA

 


Courses for Non-Majors

The Interior Design area invites students from other majors into the following courses on a space-available basis. Some restrictions apply as noted below. Please e–mail the ID Area Chair for registration clearance, as needed.

ARID 2210 Concepts in Design
ARID 3210 History of Decorative Arts I
ARID 3220 History of Decorative Arts II
ARID 3340 Furniture Design
ARID 4015/6015 Documentation of Vernacular Architecture
ARID 4410/6410 Time-based Media and Design

ARID 2210 Concepts in Design

Techniques for developing ideas and advancing creative and problem-solving skills while designing three-dimensional spaces. Taught in the context of professional practice in interior design and related fields.

ARID 3210 Design History I

A historical survey of architecture and concepts of interior space, furniture, and allied crafts as a background for contemporary design.

NOTE: Course does NOT meet Art History elective requirements for non-ID students.

ARID 3220 Design History II

Decorative arts of Europe and America beginning with the Arts and Crafts Movement of the nineteenth century and continuing through the twentieth century.

NOTE: Course does NOT meet Art History elective requirements for non-ID students.

ARID 3340 Furniture Design

Cabinetry and furniture design, including construction methods, drawings, and design presentation.
NOTE: Student must demonstrate previous drafting or CAD experience to qualify.

ARID 4015/6015 Documentation of Vernacular Architecture

To study and investigate the socio-cultural influence on traditional indigenous buildings and houses; family structure, social customs, and religion. Involves the documentation of house plans and elevations; identification of house typologies, spatial layout and relationship of interior and exterior spaces, building materials, and construction methods used.

ARID 4410/6410 Time-Based Media and Design

Time-based media as tool and catalyst for designing objects and/or spaces. Use of walkthroughs, fly-arounds, animations, and renderings in ideation, development, and presentation processes. Employs multiple CAD, drawing, rendering, photo, and/or video software programs.

NOTE 1: Student should have experience using AutoCAD, Rhino, or similar software.
NOTE 2: ARID 3410 or ARST 4810/6810 or permission of department.