“Object in Focus: The Orpheus Relief Project” at GMOA

Assistant professor Marke Abbe leads a collaboration with the Georgia Museum and UGA scientists to uncover pigment use in ancient art
“Object in Focus: The Orpheus Relief Project” at GMOA

The Athens Banner Herald features the work of LDSOA assistant professor Mark Abbe, GMOA curator Lynn Boland, UGA colleagues from chemistry and the university's Center for Applied Isotope Studies.

A new exhibit at the Georgia Museum of Art, “Object in Focus: The Orpheus Relief Project” is bringing together professors from the University of Georgia’s art and chemistry departments, and scientists from the university’s Center for Applied Isotope Studies.
In recent years, researchers have made it known that classical sculptures were vibrantly painted, and not the pristine white marble works that have dictated how society views ancient Greece and Rome.
At UGA, a fragment of an ancient relief depicting Hermes escorting Eurydice to the underworld, a tale from Greek mythology, is under view.

Image: A group of students listen as researchers describe why they will use a hyper spectral camera to study a Classical Greek sculpture at the Georgia Museum of Art on Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2012 in Athens, Ga. Richard Hamm/Staff OnlineAthens/Athens Banner-Herald.